• Ramp Access Outcomes

    Perhaps the best way to describe how someone feels after getting a ramp is transformed! We have added to that a few other descriptions we've heard along the way. They are the OUTCOMES we energize with each new wheelchair ramp. We also think of each as a motivator for why we do what we do.

     

    Freedom

    Home is no longer a self-perceived prison.

    Emergency Accessibility

    Emergency medical personnel have safe entrance and exit from the house.

    Unlimited Mobility

    Independent travel becomes more than what is defined by four walls.

    Increased Personal Safety

    Less opportunity for falling. Also feelings of greater personal security.

    Independence

    No more waiting to leave the home until another person can be available. Life without constraints.

    Improved Mental Wellness

    Forced isolation from others because of home constraints contributes to low self-esteem and depression.

    Community Re-engagement

    Unassisted access to bus lines or independent transportation encourages involvement with church, clubs, employment, and civic duties to list but a few.

    Social Visits

    Whether visiting friends, or having others into the home, house accessibility is no longer a barrier. This is especially so for other wheelchair-bound persons.

    Self Determination

    Self determination is taking action in ones own life to get the things wanted or needed. Self-determination usually contributes to positive results in areas like employment, educa­tion, community living, and an improved quality of life. (Wehmeyer et al., 2003).

    Less Pain

    Being moved or carried by another frequently means pain and great discomfort.

    Outdoors Enjoyment

    "I can get outside and watch birds at my feeder." "I can play with my dog." "I can get outdoors with my grandchildren." These are not uncommon responses after a wheelchair access ramp is installed.

    Reinforced Community Problem-Solving

    Nothing more promotes future community problem-solving than successful prior community problem-solving.

    And the list goes on . . .